How to juice a pomegranate

The pomegranate is a delicious fruit with many health benefits, but it can get really messy. When I want to treat my family to fresh, antioxidant-rich pomegranate juice, I seed and juice my pomegranates in the following easy, low-tech way:

1. Cut the pomegranates in half (as shown in the picture, bottom right).

2. Hold the pomegranate halves above a large bowl and seed. I do that by knocking on the outer peel with the handle of a heavy knife – a technique taught by my father-in-law. You can also just remove the seeds with your hands.

3. Once you have the bowl of pomegranate seeds (see picture, top right), mash them with something flat and heavy. I use a beer stein for this purpose – put it on top of the seeds in the bowl, bottom down, and press. The juice will flow.

4. Strain the juice by placing a strainer over a second bowl and pouring the contents of the first. Often, you will have residual juice after the first straining, so press some more.

The fresh pomegranate juice should be consumed as soon as possible so that its unique properties aren’t lost. It gives an antioxidant boost and is also an astringent, great for upset stomach and diarrhea.

The peels go on the compost pile and the remaining seed pulp to the chickens, who love it, so nothing is wasted!

3 thoughts on “How to juice a pomegranate

  1. Love fresh pomegranates. They taste so good! Our grandchildren used to enjoy eating them out of hand. They made the most wonderful mess, staining there mouths red, and invariably dropping seeds on the floor to be stepped on later.

    They are, of course, often used in religious art to show the Lord’s love. Just as there are too many seeds to count, so we receive more blessings than we can number.

    Liked by 1 person

    • In the Jewish tradition, it is believed that the pomegranate has 613 seeds, just as there are 613 commandments. Someone did an experiment and meticulously counted the seeds of a few pomegranates. The average was surprisingly close to 613.

      Like

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